• The average Marylander ranks their 2022 optimism outlook at 6.3/10.
  • Rhode Islanders are the most optimistic in America. 
  • Optimism Index Interactive Map included.

Given that 2021 started with a riot at the Capitol and ended with another highly contagious surge of a new Covid variant, one could argue that the optimism bar for 2022 has been set pretty low. Yet we genuinely do have reasons to be optimistic for the year ahead, if anything because we have become more resilient, according to a University of Michigan poll. Moreover, infections from Omicron appear to be declining; most schools, colleges and many workplaces have reopened, and airports are once again running on full capacity. Life is tentatively returning back to normal… 

SolitaireBliss.com wanted to ascertain just how optimistic Americans are about the year ahead, carrying out a survey of 5,725respondents across the country in an attempt to determine their outlook on this upcoming year. However, given the events over the past couple of years, it is understandable that the survey revealed we are approaching 2022 with somewhat trepidation – perhaps a fear the worst, hope for the best kinda attitude. Overall, Americans rank their optimism towards 2022 a relatively mediocre 6/10. Marylanders, on the other hand, are the 10th most optimistic about the year ahead – rating theirs at 6.3/10 – making them among the most optimistic in America!

Created by Solitaire Bliss  • View larger version

When broken down across the country, this optimism ranking was highest in Rhode Island at 7.2/10, and lowest in nearby Maine, which averaged out at 4.5/10.

One of the biggest benefits of the pandemic has been that we have taken advantage of the benefits of interacting with others online. Joining virtual groups for a variety of things, such as pilates workouts, community groups, and online gaming, the virtual world has helped more people engage with others at levels they would not necessarily have done so before. Moreover, services such as teletherapy grew significantly, helping many people, particularly those who were alone or had mental health issues.

SolitaireBliss.com also questioned respondents in The Old Line State on what aspects they are most optimistic about for the year ahead and the results were as follows:

  • Seeing more friends and family in person: 33%
  • Progress in the fight against Covid: 31%
  • An improved economy, better personal finance: 20%
  • Improving their mental health and brain sharpness: 14%
  • Progress in tackling climate change: 2%

Considering its mass impact on our daily lives, as well as the immense loss it’s caused, it’s no surprise that many people are perhaps manifesting positivity towards the fight against Covid. And following months of strict lockdown, it’s also unsurprising that so many people are looking forward to improving their mental health and brain sharpness – leaving behind the much-maligned ‘pandemic brain’; as well as seeing more loved ones in person. Interestingly, climate change seems to be the last thing people are optimistic towards – could this be because many are aware of the seriously negative state in which the environment currently stands?

‘It’s extremely tough to stay positive when life keeps dishing out lemons – especially for what seems like absolute ages following the outbreak of the pandemic nearly two years ago,’ says Neal Taparia for SolitaireBliss.com. ‘However, while there are significant concerns about the effects of climate change, for which people are rightly quite pessimistic about, there are many things we can be optimistic about, which we are more in control of – spending more time with friends and family, and keeping our brains occupied are great ways to keep reduce levels of stress, particularly when life can get a bit overwhelming.’


David M. Higgins II, Publisher/Editor

David M. Higgins was born in Baltimore and grew up in Southern Maryland. He has had a passion for journalism since high school. After spending many years in the Hospitality Industry he began working in...

Leave a comment

Leave a Reply